Gondwana Living

Gondwana’s Home Owner Blog

March 12, 2018

Wildlife update with Jono Berry (Conservation and sustainability Manager)

Photo credits: Zebra - Magdelene, Rainbow - PierreGondwana has enjoyed some lovely rain in January with over 94 mm falling at Lehele and an additional 15mm in February. This is up to three times the figure of neighbouring farmers in the area. The rainfall has provided a fantastic green flush of grass for the grazers.There has been a lot happening w
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March 12, 2018

Radio Jargon at Gondwana

Whilst out on game drive in many reserves in South Africa, there is another language that comes into play between field guides over their radio network. This radio jargon has evolved over time derived mostly from local African languages to allow the field guides to discuss sightings and updates . There is no translation app or google connection to
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March 12, 2018

Home owner profile – Italo Fioravanti

1. What brought us to Gondwana?We did some research on the internet for different types of investments during the downturn in the economy a few years ago and came across Gondwana. We first bought stand FC2 with the intention of one day building on it. We instantly fell in love with Gondwana and when FC3 came on the market a little later, we decided
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March 12, 2018

Erica cerinthoides

A relatively common heath, widespread and native to South Africa, Erica cerinthoides is flowering in bursts of crimson on the reserve at the moment. It is also known as fire heath, red hairy heath or rooihaartjie. The flowers on Erica cerinthoides are fascinating as they are an unusually deep shade of red and are arranged in umbels of 7 to 10 flowe
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December 1, 2017

Fynbos, Renosterveld and Fire

Gondwana comprises of Fynbos and Rensoterveld areas. Both Fynbos and Rensosterveld are critically endangered biomes with, renosterveld being close to extinction. These biomes have a fascinating relationship with fire and their plant richness relies heavily on this element. In this post I will focus predominantly on Fynbos as the factors that affect
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December 1, 2017

Home Owner Profile – Christa Van Rensburg

1. What brought you to Gondwana? Red Rocks used to be our farm and I was initially very sad that Gerrit decided to sell it to become part of Gondwana. Most of my favourite Fynbos species grow in the area for example Protea cynaroides, Mimetis, Erica cerinthoides (rooi haarjie),"and other Protea species, like Coronata,"that one cannot find on Fonte
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December 1, 2017

The Cape Sugarbird

The Cape Sugarbird is a common sight, seen fluttering above the Fynbos of Gondwana Game Reserve. Not only does this bird signify one of the Magnificent 8 birds in this region (which are sought after by bird watchers across the world) but it also has many interesting characteristics.The sugarbirds are easily recognizable by a spot of yellow under
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December 1, 2017

Controlled Burning at Gondwana

 Why do we undertake controlled burning?Joe :  “We do controlled burning for two purposes. For the vegetation / conservation management of the reserve and for fire protection for all infrastructure. On the vegetation front, we know that Fynbos needs to burn approximately every seven years for regeneration purposes and some Fynbos can even
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December 1, 2017

Leucospermum cordifolium, the ants and the fire

Looking at the importance of fire and the ecological Fynbos cycles that benefit from it, Leucospermum cordifolium is reliant on fire to germinate its seed and in turn produce new plants.Leucospermum cordifolium has a fascinating ecology. The flowers produce sweet nectar that attracts insects and birds. Sugar birds and sun birds feed on the nectar a
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